Welcome to Fishing Knots.

 


Sharp hooks and good fishing knots are essential factors in fishing. Most break offs are due to poor knots. It is essential to spend time on learning a few basic knots and, when tying them, take time and do a good job.

For example, if you are thinking about alaska fishing vacations, it is important to practice your finshing knots before.

Choose the right fishing knot and tie it correctly. Lubricate knots with water or saliva before drawing tight. Draw knots as tight as possible. Trim tag ends close to the fishing knots.

The average angler needs perhaps no more than three or four basic fishing knots, but these knots relate directly to his mode of fishing. The game fisherman need have little interest in the knots used by the trout fisherman, who, in turn, uses fishing knots that are not necessarily suitable for the bream fisherman.

Tying good fishing knots is one of the most important things to learn. Practice, practice, practice!

The knot can make all the difference between boating a big fish, or losing it. I suggest that you select only those few fishing knots that are of the greatest use to you, and practice, practice, practice tying them until they become second nature to you. It is most important that you use knots that can be tied in an easily remembered manner. There is little point using a knot that can only be tied by reference to a book.

Good fishing knots need not be too complicated to remember, nor too difficult to execute. And a relative few will do just about any job an angler might require. When tying knots in monofilament, keep these pointers in mind. Snug all knots with even, steady pressure. Don’t jerk them tight. Wet the knot to lubricate the line when drawing it tight. Don’t knick the knot or line when cutting off the tag end, and don’t cut the tag end too short. Check hook eye or lure for rough spots that might cut or abrade line.

For example, the snell knot tying, is used for because the snell knot allows the leader, or tippet, to be directly related to a baited hook. The snell knot was originally invented for the use of hooks with no eyes, but still widely used today. It aligns the fishing line or leader of the hook.

Binding: The Snell knot requires wrapping a loop around the hook. When tightening the knot, hold the turns in the fingers to make sure you carefully adjusted downward.

Advantages of snell knot tying: The Snell Knot is one of the knots and is said to provide a reliable connection that preserves the strength of the line – especially if the thickness of the eye is larger than the diameter of the line.





See the fishing knots

 

Tying good fishing knots is one of the most important things to learn. Practice, practice, practice!

The knot can make all the difference between boating a big fish, or losing it. I suggest that you select only those few fishing knots that are of the greatest use to you, and practice, practice, practice tying them until they become second nature to you. It is most important that you use knots that can be tied in an easily remembered manner. There is little point using a knot that can only be tied by reference to a book.

Good fishing knots need not be too complicated to remember, nor too difficult to execute. And a relative few will do just about any job an angler might require. When tying knots in monofilament, keep these pointers in mind. Snug all knots with even, steady pressure. Don't jerk them tight. Wet the knot to lubricate the line when drawing it tight. Don't knick the knot or line when cutting off the tag end, and don't cut the tag end too short. Check hook eye or lure for rough spots that might cut or abrade line.

Fishing knots: Blood Knot
This fishing knot is commonly used to join two lines of about the same diameter. A good alternative to the Albright knot but not as good as a Surgeon's knot.

Fishing Knots: Clinch Knot
The Improved Clinch is very easy to tie, which is the main reason it's so popular for connecting monofilament to terminal tackle. It's most effective on lines under 20-pound test.

Fishing Knots: snelling a hook
When snelling a hook, restrict it to lines with a breaking strength of less than 50 pounds.


Fishing Knots: dropper loop
This is the basic knot for a High Low and other bait rigs, with practice it is very easy tie. I don't do as many loops as the professionals recommend but I know people have taken bass up to 40 lbs on my rigs without a problem. On the other hand if you're after a new world record the Dropper Loop isn't strong enough.

Fishing Knots: palomar knot
The best all around fishing knots and very easy to tie, even in the middle of the night when you're standing in the water. It has been proven to be one of the strongest knots to hold terminal tackle.

Fishing Knots: crawford knot
The Crawford knot often is overlooked by even the most skilled anglers because its a pain to tie! It is a very versatile knot for tying most types of hook, swivel, or lure "eyes" to a leader or line.

Fishing Knots: brubaker loop knot
A new knot that gives lures a "free swinging" action. This non-slipping loop knot is simple to tie because it combines two well known knots, the simple overhand and the popular improved clinch.